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Learning Driving is More Fun in the Philippines

Taking driving lessons in Surigao means reaching good tourist destinations

sunny 33 °C

Being out of work or jobless gave me opportunities to do things I disregarded during busy times. I went home to my birthplace to pass the time while waiting for interview calls. The very first thing in mind was to practice driving.

Papa Tantong was my teacher and Mama Dulcing was my passenger. The pressure to perform well was high considering that my parents were my assessors or evaluators.

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During the first day of driving lessons, we headed to the adjacent town to the westernmost coast of Surigao del Norte, the Municipality of Malimono. This was formerly the route of my father when he was driving the passenger jeepney. I also had several memories of this town when I was active in the Surigao diocesan Catholic youth ministry. We sort of rediscovering the accessibility of this remote place as well as checking out the road condition in comparison to the improved access road our town, Anao-aon, is currently experiencing.

We noticed drastic improvements but still needs more, as the road construction was put on hold due to political instability. But yes, the road is passable and reaching this remote town is now seemed closer than was experienced before.

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The next day of driving lesson took the same route but reaching only the boundary of Anao-aon and Malimono. The following day took the new route within my hometown; we headed south to Barangay Macopa and then took U-turn and headed west to Barangay Banbanon. In Macopa, I reminisced my younger days when I with some friends swam at the barangay's water dam. In Banbanon, my parents and I marveled at the awesome rock formations along the beach.

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The other days of learning driving took the route to some barangays of the nearby Surigao City. I drove the hilly parts of Lipata, Punta Bilar, Sitio Looc, and Mabua. We just discovered that the road traversing Lipata and Mabua via Sitio Looc is now accessible. I remembered Looc to be still living up to its monicker (Looc means hidden valley), that one has to trek his way into it, both from Punta Bilar and Mabua. Now, a concrete road construction is ongoing.

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With the new road condition, the picturesque sunset at Punta Bilar peaks can now be witnessed any day, the pristine pebbled beach of Looc can now be experienced easily any time of any day, and crossing from any points (Lipata, Punta Bilar, Looc or Mabua) can now be done any time.

Posted by crisbernal 11:49 Archived in Philippines Tagged beaches beach driving drive roadtrip landtrip rockformations

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